1 min read

Artists' Best Friend?

By Kay McKinley, Director of Public Programs on 10/12/2017

Silly, protective, patient, loyal, cuddly−how would you infuse these canine characteristics into a piece of clay or the stroke of a brush? That's the job of the seven invited Featured Artists in the exhibition Man's Best Friend, on view October 20- December 30.

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2 min read

Fire Fuels the Art of Celebration

By Kay McKinley, Director of Public Programs on 09/28/2017

The climax of our annual Iron Pour benefit is the spectacle of the pouring of molten iron; glowing red-hot as it cascades into tile molds from a cupola, tossing fiery sparks in the air. It got me thinking about the correlation between fire and celebrations.

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1 min read

Exhibit is Entrée to SOUP!

By Kay McKinley, Director of Public Programs on 09/14/2017

With a focus on ceramic decorative techniques, Beyond Scratching the Surface: Today's Ceramic Decoration exhibition provides a fitting segway into our annual SOUP! project.

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1 min read

It's All About the Base

By Kay McKinley, Director of Public Programs on 08/21/2017

Although the current exhibition, Beyond Scratching the Surface: Today's Ceramic Decoration, focuses on how potters choose to embellish their work, I believe these marks must be secondary to the quality and design of a work's form. Case in point: a lovingly made ashtray by a 5-year-old as opposed to a professionally wheel-thrown porcelain jardeniere.

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1 min read

Like Watching Paint Dry?

By Kay McKinley, Director of Public Programs on 07/06/2017

The saying "it's like watching paint dry" generally describes the most boring of experiences. With an event that entails the act of witnessing paint do its thing, it would be easy to dismiss a plein air festival as having little to no appeal to those who aren't festival artists.

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1 min read

Back to the Future En Plein Air

By Kay McKinley, Director of Public Programs on 06/22/2017

The introduction of plein air painting in the late 1800s was possible due to the invention of two items we take for granted today: the French easel and paint in tubes. Imagine the delight of Monet and his comrades during their first experiences painting out of doors. Unchained from their studios, they could respond to the spectacle of sparkling sunlight or the touch of a breeze on their skin.

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