Painting with Pixels Exhibition

It's no secret that people are typically resistant to change. The Devil's advocate comes out to play when new ideas or methods are brought to light. So, it's natural, even in the artistic realm, for new media to be downplayed as not having the right criteria to be considered fine art.

Our upcoming exhibition, Painting with Pixels, encourages visitors to answer this question for themselves: If a painting is created with anything other than a brush, palette knife, or even fingers, can it be fine art?  I'd like for you to consider that perhaps it's not the tool, but the structure behind it that determines whether a painting is worthy of the distinction of being described as fine art.

In order for a painting or other work of art to be successful, the composition must be both compelling and balanced. A composition begins with basic shapes, in other words, building blocks. Their arrangement in terms of size and value must be sound in order for a painting not to "fall apart."

Usher in the pixel, the square (sometimes rectangular) building block of digital processes. Although a computer is utilized, an artist must still select colors, values, and digital brushes while determining elements of composition. Using his fingers or a stylus on a device's screen, the artist arranges pixels in specific ways to create imagery.

Many fine artists, including iconic contemporary artist David Hockney, have embraced iPad painting as their primary medium of expression -- and have done so for decades. The same is true for our Painting with Pixels Featured Artists. You're invited to formulate your own opinions about works that are created digitally by touring the Painting with Pixels exhibition, May 19-July 15. Or, bring any doubts and questions to Featured Artists Paula Oeler and Dave Tilton during our gallery talk/opening reception on Friday, May 19 from 4-6pm. You might find that whether the medium is tile in a mosaic, photos in a collage, or pixels in a digital painting, that it is indeed hip to be (creating with a) square.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Dave Tilton, digital portrait
  • Coda, digital collaboration of Paula Oeler and Dave Tilton

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